Mentors Collective Entrepreneurs

Build Passive Income with YouTube Automation with Caleb Boxx

August 20, 2020 Dr. Jay Feldman / Caleb Boxx Season 2 Episode 20
Mentors Collective Entrepreneurs
Build Passive Income with YouTube Automation with Caleb Boxx
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Mentors Collective Entrepreneurs
Build Passive Income with YouTube Automation with Caleb Boxx
Aug 20, 2020 Season 2 Episode 20
Dr. Jay Feldman / Caleb Boxx

On this series on passive income, 19-year-old Caleb Boxx teaches us how he uses YouTube automation to earn a high 6 figure income. He also shares some MASSIVE insights into how to set up your YouTube channel and videos to go viral and grow fast so they can earn you money.
Be sure to follow his Instagram: @calebboxx

Support the show (https://mentorscollective.com/support)

Show Notes Transcript

On this series on passive income, 19-year-old Caleb Boxx teaches us how he uses YouTube automation to earn a high 6 figure income. He also shares some MASSIVE insights into how to set up your YouTube channel and videos to go viral and grow fast so they can earn you money.
Be sure to follow his Instagram: @calebboxx

Support the show (https://mentorscollective.com/support)

Jay Feldman :

What is up everybody and welcome to the mentors collective on entrepreneurship on this show, actually, this week, I'm doing basically a whole segment on passive income. I love the idea of passive income everyone else does. However, the misconceptions behind it and how it works are so misconstrued. So I'm doing something pretty unique. I'm bringing people on who are basically executing different areas of passive income to come and teach you what they're doing, how much work actually goes into it, and maybe you can replicate their methods on your own. On this episode, we're talking about YouTube automation. And I have one of the foremost experts on social media right now on that his name is Caleb is 19 years old. He's got an awesome story, and he actually teaches people how to do this on his own. Without further ado, Caleb, thank you so much for joining me, I know you're gonna offer a ton of value to my audience, where to talk about passive income. We're going to talk about YouTube automation, and maybe you could offer some insight for people on how maybe they can get into it as well. So let's get right into get right into it. Tell me your story. Caleb, I know we just talked a little bit before this, but

Caleb Boxx :

yeah, I'm pillbox So pretty much when I started out. It was in 20 sixteens when I started, I was 16 years old at the time, you know, at the time I was playing around with YouTube, but I wanted to take as seriously as every kid nowadays wants to make YouTube a hobby, you know, or job lab was where I was at a point in my life where I realized that college was definitely not going to be a route. You know, you see my older friends who were already in college and I noticed that it wasn't working out for them. I didn't like the idea for me unless you're being a doctor, lawyer or whatever it is the major ones that you really need to go to college for. For me, I just knew I was just going to end up in a lot of debt and I saw my friends try to get out of college and get a job didn't work out for them. They couldn't even get a job and like, okay, I don't want to have $30,000 that came by the job. So I knew that wasn't probably going to be the right way. And so for me looking at YouTube, I was like, Okay, how can I make this work for me and so I started with like $200 left in my bank account from like fast food jobs. I ended up quitting and everything and I decided to go all in with YouTube, I was gonna find some way to make it happen for me. And so what I did is when I went on YouTube and I started watching different YouTube channels and studying different YouTube channels and one YouTube channel popped up that got a million subscribers. Just about 90 days. So it went from like zero to a million. This guy was like really killing it like, Okay, I gotta figure out how can I get in contact with this guy and learn from him. He was live streaming a q&a. And I was just like, Okay, this is perfect. So, you know, obviously you can donate money in a q&a, and then they can see it. It's like a Super Chat thing. So I went and donated money to him, and I joined my last like, $200 just to get his attention because no one's going to donate $200 right. So that was gonna get his attention. And my hope was that through that he was going to go ahead and get in a quick call with me. So in the donation text, Sam saying, Hey, I would love to get a quick call view. This is my last bit of money. I just want 10 minutes, 15 minutes of your time, you know, that's all I need. Right? So you went ahead and is like, Alright, fine, you know, is like, why would you do that? $200 might as well. So we hopped on the call right after his stream and I broke down everything. I was like, Look, I really want to make this work. I see that you know what you're doing, you know, how do I get the knowledge for myself, I'm willing to work for free. I'm willing to edit your videos, I'm willing to do whatever it takes just in exchange to learn YouTube, you know, make a full time for myself. So you know, obviously for him is kind of hard for him to turn down in exchange for free video is being edited, it takes them maybe, you know, $50 $60 at least to pay someone to do, you can get it for free and just teach me you know, get on a call with me every day. So he was like, Alright down, like let's do it. So I ended up working with him and I would make all these videos for him and then we would post them and go viral, he would teach me all the little things about it. He then was so impressed by my work ethic that he ended up adding me into a group conversation with a lot of other bigger YouTubers. And so today, they're still con connected with a lot of them. But today there are some of the biggest YouTube stars like one of them in the group conversations was Mr. Beast. So Mr. Beast now has almost 40 million subscribers at the time, he only had like 100,000 subscribers. So we would get in daily calls all those back in like the end of 2016. And always talk in those conversations every day about YouTube. How can we do certain things, how I studied little details I never even thought about doing that just made the biggest difference. And so that's where I really develop my craft and then after video after video, you slowly become kind of a master at it. And so that's how I kind of got started and then I slowly started to learn from These other guys and we started to figure out a business model called you know YouTube automation at the time wasn't called that you know later you know me and a few others decided to name it that for marketing but at the end of the day what it is is where you hire people to really do the content for you and it creates passive income you know, just like a business you hire people one day get a team underneath you it can kind of create a level of passive income for you maybe only need to work three hours or so week to you know, oversee it. And so we got up to that point, you know, we use every bit we could have money to go ahead and risk it and put it on these different content team, train them up and give them education on how to do exactly what I did when I started out. And when I reached out to a YouTuber, and training these other kids how to make videos and then they built made videos for us. So we pretty much ended up outsourcing it like education, and then we use that additional money to keep you know, upgrading our videos. And so eventually started making like $10,000 a month from just one YouTube channel and I only had to work like three hours a week on the YouTube channel. And so eventually I was like, Okay, I can duplicate this I would keep duplicating these different YouTube channels eventually create so much income streams and Have the free time to do it now and have the money to do it because you have this business model where you can just hire a team to just do it. And so when I, when I was realized I was onto something, then slowly over time, you know, three years later Now I'm like, Alright, now I want to go out there and teach other people how to do it and scale it that way. Because for me in the game now, like, finance wise, I'm good. Like, I'm chilling. I'm living a good life for my age and everything and 19. And so for me now, it's just the game that I enjoy building YouTube channels and see it skyrocket. So for us, with our clients, it's like, okay, you know, it just gives us a little bit of profit. For me, it's just I want to see how big I can get this going. So that's where we are now. Love it. Love it. Absolutely amazing story. Now for YouTube, obviously, the biggest thing is content. So I'm curious, because I mean, I'm a content creator in a way, but I don't think I'm a viral content creator. I don't think I'm going to get 40 million subscribers on YouTube doing stuff like this. Can anyone create the content that's going to go viral? How do you find the talent? What types of videos do you guys create? So first of all, I think there's a certain level of you develop it over time again goes back to skill set. Just a knowledge, where you start to figure out who has the specific talent that can create a really enticing video and what team you can put in place to create it for you. And so you kind of have that gauge that you develop over time to figure that out. So for our team, that's kind of what it is we train them up. So first we find someone that we we see talent in, but we know in the needs more work, right, and we build them up, we train them up, we give them all the information, they know, we train them up, we gain calls with them for the first like 60 days until they're really good at what they do. For the average person who's you know, obviously trying to do let's say, a face video, you know, like you like a personal brand, something like that. A lot comes down to you to obviously get in front of the camera and talk to the camera, the thing that you can outsource is stuff like video editing, you can get away with that, you know, when you think about it, if it takes you three hours or two hours to edit a video, if you can find a way to outsource that pay someone to do that for you. That gives you two or three hours additional to make another video. And so when you look at it from that angle, it's just a scalability perspective, from an algorithm standpoint, how do I grow How do I get to that point one day, you know 40 million Drivers, whatever, there's an angle to it, where depends on the vehicle you're in. By that I mean the niche. And that really is important. So if you're in the entrepreneur niche entrepreneur niche, you got to look at what kind of views Do you see in that niche. Typically, you'll see a max million viewed video on a really viral video, and it's hard to get to that point. So maybe you'll see a 500 k view video. And that'd be the average I call it average viral video length, or like view count. And so you have to know that engage, like if it's worth getting into based on your experience based on your knowledge or what you really want to do. Finance wise. One thing I do know is that there's things and this is going really deep into YouTube. But there's a thing called CPM which is how you make money. YouTube ad revenue is one of the bigger factors, but CPM is pretty much every 1000 views. How much can you make, right? So every 1000 views on average, you can maybe make three $4. Okay, and the entrepreneur niche, I know that niche is very high. So that's like $20, sometimes it's the highest one niche out of all them. So we really think about if you're getting 500,000 views, it's a low amount of views compared to maybe if you went to some niche, I don't know like celebrity drama, celebrity drama gets, you know, millions of views, right? But that CPM in the Oscar niche will actually end up making it the same amount of money you would probably make per video like per viral video compared to if you got a, you know, 2 million 3 million viewed celebrity drama video, right? So it kind of becomes a balanced game. So money wise, like subscribers versus money is not a good way to figure out if they're if they're making more money if they have more subscribers than the specific person that doesn't necessarily mean they're making more money than that specific person. Gotcha. Do you know that was actually a question

Jay Feldman :

that was coming next because I was like, okay, because my, you know, 1000 views as an entrepreneur because those viewers are typically a higher value viewer, then you know, the 3 million people watching the street fight. That's super valuable information right there. So do you see any commonalities between the talent that you hire to create this different content? Are you looking for fashion? Are you looking for fitness? Are you looking for entrepreneur? Or is it just kind of all over the place? are you creating dog relaxation videos or music videos or meditation videos, stuff that doesn't require human presence?

Caleb Boxx :

For us most of our videos is like human base like commentary is what we call base videos. Just because we notice commentary, you can actually have a better connection with the audience and they keep coming back a little bit more often. And it's also just easier to get that monetized. So we usually go for that type of videos. I mean, for us, what I really try to focus on when it comes down to finding team members and everything is I really just tried to look at like, how well do they take pride in their work, right. And if they can get that work done on a specific deadline, those two are the most important thing. So if they try to slack off, especially if we just hired them, it's not a good sign. And so we have to move on and cut our losses, find someone else, right. And so I really like the not even entrepreneur, but I like funding and once you don't even realize that they're entrepreneurs, but they are entrepreneurs. Because those ones just have a different mentality. They are not yet developed and understanding to think like that. And so if you can come in there and almost be a mentor for them, and teach them a little bit about how to think and how to look at the business world, there'll be so much more grateful. They'll do videos for you and so much more grateful to work with you, because you you're building a real relationship with your team. And this goes to any business like this can be applied in any business principle, like building a team is going to be required if you want to make it pass, like, you know, six figures want to make the seven figures, you have to have some level of a team. So it comes down to the CEO, the leader of that team to know how to a project the vision, like where are we going? How are we going to get there? Who's all is everyone going to be able to benefit? Because if I'm saying, hey, let's get this shout a million views, because I'm going to benefit and you guys, well, no one's really going to be motivated, right? So you gotta you got to create compensations to motivate everybody in your team and give them a future and that really like shines a light and helps them to keep pushing to do good content or create really good pieces of content for awesome.

Jay Feldman :

So you know, me and probably a lot of people watching this are thinking the same thing like make me famous on YouTube. You've got the team in place, you've got the talent, what does that kind of plan look like when you hire talent or the talent talent hires you? What does that compensation plan look like? And do you work with YouTube influencers on a contract basis, where they can pay you for whatever it is that you've obviously been proven to do?

Caleb Boxx :

Yeah. I've done so many different contracts totally depends on the level of work because with YouTube, there's so many different types of work. And sometimes every person wants something different, right? So obviously, we have to compensate based on our time. I know when I worked with one YouTuber, Preston, he has over 13 million subscribers right now. He hired me back in the day, and I helped him with YouTube and we got some viral videos going on for him. And so my job for him back when I worked with him was I would create the viral video ideas. I would then help out with managing the team, the graphic team and then talking and speaking with the production team be like, Hey, this is the scene here. There's our life is this following scene is what we're going to do here. You know, we need to get this item in like one of the items we had to get was like a watermelon. a sledgehammer. Like we did crazy dumb videos, right? So my job was almost the production like quality guy who would have to figure out okay, we have to get this before we film. We have to get this we have to manage that. And then I would script right? The video, I'd be like, Alright, scene one is here, C two, it's almost like a movie, right? And then you just do all that. And so my main job is just that organizing, managing the team coming up with just a really viable idea and really pay attention to quality control. super

Jay Feldman :

interesting. So components of a viral video, I guess there's a, there's got to be a creative mastermind behind all of that stuff. Is that you for most of these videos, or have you been able to find an outsource creativity? Because I found that to be the hardest thing?

Caleb Boxx :

Yeah, I think for me, there's definitely a way to outsource creativity. But what I've noticed is that takes time to for a person to develop that. And so it's your job as the leader to develop that in the person. But that can take you four or five months before the person finally gets it in their head to understand what to look for and what to pay attention to. So it's kind of where you have to take the lead of that until the person understands it. And then that person can then manage the channel for you at that point, because now they get it right. And so it's a process. I mean, it's something that you can't do overnight. It's definitely something that takes some time.

Jay Feldman :

Okay, that's super interesting. So take me through the process of actually creating the viral video to promoting it with the tags. What are the important parts, the thumbnail, the tags, where you're sharing it? What are the components? What are the ingredients that go into making that video go viral. So

Caleb Boxx :

for us, we call it like a, almost an assembly line. So the way we have it set up is, it starts off with the video idea. Obviously, we want to come up with a really good enticing video idea. So we'll do a lot of research for the video idea. We'll go online find, you know, maybe similar ideas that is working and try to kind of make our own version of that because if it works, reality is they'll probably work for us if we make it better, right? So we try to go first off and try to find a viral video idea. Once we do that, then we'll go ahead and try to come up with a thumbnail first, most people do the thumbnail last and you can totally do the thumbnail last if you're a face person, because if it if it's a video that requires you to have the thumbnail last because you have to wait till you get to that point, then that's totally fine. But for our type of content, we always put it first because we can and so we what I usually end up doing with my team. I'm like if we can't come up with a really clickable I click Beatty thumbnail for this video idea is just not really worth us coming up with it like using the video idea like the thumbnail in video idea is so important because think about from this perspective. When you're scrolling on YouTube, you're seeing so much competition so many videos that you could totally click on. So if your video is not Good like from getting their attention to click on then it doesn't matter if your video is the best video ever, when you actually watch the video, it really comes down to the click Beatty part, right, you have to first hook them in to click on the video in the first place. They don't know how good it is until they do that. So once they click on it, then what ends up happening is then they'll go ahead and watch the actual video. And this is where the next like key part comes into play, which is the script like how can you create a script that's enticing. You don't want a script that bores people and makes people click off the video. So we always read through the script because we have a script writing team and everything we always read through the script ahead of time we're like, okay, it does anywhere in this text, would I if I was in the viewers perspective, we always do this with my team. Like always think from the viewers perspective, right? It's better to think from that then from your perspective, right? If I'm in the viewers perspective, I'm reading this script right here and it says something here that makes me want to click off the video, delete it and remove it like you want to try to make sure that keep people on hook every next two paragraphs hook hook hook, so they have to keep watching till the very end of the video. That's the most important thing you have to do. Once you got the script figured out. Then you can hire you know, the narrator They go in there like an amazing voice and just narrate it word for word and make it really enticing and enjoyable. And then you can send send that off to the video editor. They'll put it all together and then you just upload the video How important are tags? How important is posting frequency? How important is your subscribers talk to talk to me about some of those elements? Yeah, so first of all subscribers are not really important. I would say once you have like 5000 subscribers, you're good. You know, I mean, it's one of those things where a lot of people think that you need a lot of subscribers to be successful, I've actually found it to sometimes be the opposite, which is sometimes why end up selling these channels at the end of the day, because one of my channels like up next I got it up to over like 200,000 subscribers and I sold it back in May for $35,000. So like these are sold like companies and you can sell a team with them pretty much but the reason why is because once it gets to a certain level of subscribers, sometimes if the views aren't as like they used to be it's because there's too many subscribers. So whenever you post a video, they aren't clicking on the video and so sometimes it hurts the overall like performance later the video so I've noticed that Less subscribers is actually probably better to work your way up again, the more subscribers becomes a little bit more hard, you know, to get attention. So subscribers is something to really pay attention to. And then the next thing is with tags tags are not as important as people make them seem to be. I mean, you watch probably a lot of like YouTube gurus how to grow on YouTube, whatever tags is probably the biggest thing they talked about SEO and stuff. SEO is definitely important. But I would say with tags wise, you do not want to put more than 10 minutes into your tags, like I see people literally take an hour to try to come up with the perfect tag, it's not worth that amount of time to put into it. So maybe 10 minutes go around. And what I like to do is I like to see what other people use in their tags with their similar video idea that went viral and does use their tags and make it better. Like that's literally all I do. I'm like, if it worked for them, why should I re do it? Yeah, I mean, so we do that with our tags for description, wise description and Title I would say is more important than the tax like keywords that's in those areas. So in the description, we'd like to do like one or two paragraphs, and we try to put little keywords in there, but we try to make it where it looks like it's a normal, like worded paragraph. So it's not saying like, Oh, you know, let's say we're Make a Shopify dropshipping video we're not gonna say Shopify drop shipping Shopify, Shopify, we're not gonna do that, because that does, you know is weird. You're not supposed to do that. So what we do is we try to do like a special keyword. So we say, oh, In this video, we talked about Shopify dropshipping, and how you can open a Shopify dropshipping store, like we do that to try to like create a normal paragraph, but there's little keywords in them. The first and second paragraph is probably the most important thing besides the title. And obviously the title you want to try to make it with a lot of keywords and that that can

Jay Feldman :

get people's attention or offering so many gold nuggets, I love it. Absolutely love it. Okay, so we've got the perfect video tags aren't that important. We've got a description, a title, a thumbnail, that's hooky, do do anything to promote that video after posting it or just let the organic algorithm work its magic and pray for the best. So it totally depends on what phase the challenge in.

Caleb Boxx :

So the channel, let's say the channels at a point where we have an average of 200 300,200 or 300 views per video being sent to it just off of subscribers or whatever. We never really do any external promotions because that's just enough to get into the organic reach of YouTube from scratch. Typically what we'll sometimes do, if we don't see that much performance, after maybe like four or five videos of uploading, we don't really see any views at all, we'll usually actually go ahead and use other promotion outlets. So that means we'll utilize Instagram. I know for people who don't have any money, what I always recommend is create an Instagram account around that niche and try to develop a little audience quickly by following and unfollowing sending people to your Lincoln bio, and which will be like the YouTube channel in the Lincoln bio, and then try to get them to subscribe. And all you really need is like 100 200 views from doing that and four per video, and then you're good. I mean, so we have that method, or there's the paid method where you can just pay for an Instagram promo and swipe up and get people to go to it or a thing called Community post, which if you haven't seen on YouTube, people can actually do text based blog, almost like a little blog, tweet, post and everything. And so we'll sometimes work with similar niche channels and be like, Hey, you know, we'll pay you like maybe 200 bucks to go ahead and promote this one video on your community posting. So we'll do it that way. But to be honest, organic reach is really good even from scratch on YouTube, assuming you're really good with targeting the SEO and untapped, like searching, but everyone's searching for it.

Jay Feldman :

Yeah, awesome, awesome stuff right now another question about YouTube kind of operations and practices. And then I kind of want to change gears. But this last one is something that I'm super obsessive, which is tools. Are there any specific tools that you love and swear by that help you with? Whether it be you know, managing your YouTube account, finding viral ideas, anything like that, that you would recommend us use? I would say there's two tools I would say from management Trello it's pretty good. We like Trello. It's just so simple. Trello we like to manage and then we also like to buddy for copying tags and just a few other things that you buddy comes with. So those two are probably like really useful. Yep, I use both of those tools. Trello for my businesses for project management, and I have to buddy as well as my account best like 20 bucks ever spent. Yeah, makes things so easy. Okay, now, I kinda want to change gears and talk a little bit about the business aspect. So disclosure on one of my last companies, which I sold is called the Institute and the company was basically it was an Instagram basically growth and automation company. And you know, we were doing 60 70,000 a month I think at one point had like 600 active customers, it was a booming and exponentially growing business. Overnight, boom, Instagram changes, their algorithm makes automation practically useless. We've then been able to pivot and go to manual growth operations. But overnight, the whole business changed. basically shut us down went from 70 k a month to 20 k a month I hated, hated, hated, hated that my business was dependent on someone else saying that this is okay. And that scares the crap out of me for any business that I that I operate in the future. I don't know if that thought that thought is run through your head, or is there anything that youtube automators youtube growth people can look to in the future or is that do you see it changing?

Caleb Boxx :

So okay, so of YouTube automation. So there's different people that teach different things for the ones I know who will try to get like a quick sale from like a course or something. And it's a low key false advertisement, not giving them the full details of what's going on YouTube, for example, people think when they hear YouTube automation, they're thinking a compilation channel. So they think that they can grab all these clips from different people's, you know, sites or whatever, put it all together with no commentary, just editing it together, and then they're good. That's not going to really help you out. YouTube doesn't like that. So it's not best to do that for us. Like I said, we do commentary, we do that stuff. So we try to edit it a little bit. It's just you do the safe route. Yeah. And YouTube's not gonna shut you down for something safe like that. So there's that element also, from just looking at the algorithm standpoint with YouTube, the only time they've really really like changed our algorithm where things just shifted so much like everyone got hurt pretty much was in 2016, which was when I was in those calls with like, Mr. Beast and all those other YouTubers, because in those calls during that time, everybody was like, wait, what just happened? The algorithm shifted. So everyone created like little mastermind groups. At that time to figure out how can we crack the code because now it's completely different. We don't know what's happening back in the day before 2016, YouTube was very much about quantity of uploads, right? Like you have to be consistent daily quantity, all that stuff. It was not so categorised based on clickbait. And so YouTube overnight, literally switched it over to what it is now where it's like, you know, like I explained earlier, the thumbnail, all that stuff, but that was in 2016. So I haven't seen any shifts since then. So for me, it's more predictable. Now, it's a lot easier to really trust YouTube. Also, I think YouTube has been around a very long time compared to all the other outlets. So it's just something that I trust them and they also are like the only outlet that gives you money. Yeah, I mean, like, I think Instagram just started to try to give you money, but it's like, it took them way too long. You know, I mean, so I think YouTube just is as a business wants to share some of that profit, so I trust them a lot more.

Jay Feldman :

Yeah, that's why all the people are working so hard to create content on YouTube. I don't see it going anywhere. But then again, I didn't see the Instagram go anywhere either. So we'll see what happens in the future. Just something at all. Always keep in the back of your head and it's in the back of my head now obviously because of experience, but definitely something to consider. So one other thing I wanted to kind of address was I can't remember the Nick Cody Cody why another YouTube expert that I follow I think he talks about creating content that doesn't require a personality or a person in the video, creating you know, the the eight hour dog entertainment videos that I put on my channel for my TV for my dog from YouTube. Have you seen those channels be successful where you can, whether it be a meditation or a dog entertainment, or, you know, cat compilation videos?

Caleb Boxx :

Yeah, so I've seen them be successful. But the problem is that half of them get monetized. And half of them though, so again, it goes back to who wants to be on the edge and who doesn't want to play that game, right. It's like short term versus long term wins. For me, my bismol has always been I just wanted something predictable that is just safe, and may not make as much money in the short term as someone who quickly comes out for coffee. Video who tries to, you know, cut the corners as much as they can, because the truth is they're going to get demonetized, maybe six months later, my channel is still going to be around still gonna produce 10 k a month or whatever, right? So I prefer doing it that way and cutting corners. That's just how I worked. Everyone has a different method of how they work. And I know Cody personally, and he would always try to cut corners with his channels back in the day. So yeah, I mean, that's probably why he encourages that. But for me with my team and my viewers, I don't really recommend doing that.

Jay Feldman :

Gotcha. Awesome. All right, going into kind of advice for people who want to get into this and just talk a little bit about the passive income side of this starting with passive income. Would you consider this what you've built now to bring in money and will continue to bring in money without any of your direct

Caleb Boxx :

interference? I think it still requires even like real estate, it still requires a little bit of your touching just to double check and make sure things are going the right direction. If you don't ever touch it at all, it will die off. Yeah, I would say for me, I put two three hours a week into my each channel just to double check. Make sure you know Lyrics are good, everything's looking good, my team is good. And because you don't want your team to fall apart, because they now don't have their leader that's actually taking care of them. So I personally don't believe in just completely letting go, you still want to have a little bit of like, you know, feel for it. But yeah, I think it can last a very, very long time. I really don't see YouTube going anywhere for a very long time. And so for me, I'm just like, doubling down on it because I've been in this game for like, since 2016. And this business model hasn't done anything since then, you know, hasn't gone anywhere. So that's why I really think it will go even longer. Absolutely. And give us some of your best tips and learning experiences for people who want to get into YouTube. Let's start with some of your biggest learning experiences. I think the first one is definitely got to learn from someone that's successful. Um, you know, that's what I did when I started, I was learning from all those other youtubers because it's one of those things where it's like, if you don't have a person who already gone through it, you're gonna run into so many speed bumps, it's gonna take you so much longer champion to get there. And the you know, it's just better to learn from someone who's already done it, you know, you can take a lot from that. So I would say first, you know, get someone who's already Obviously a mentor who's already done it. That's the first tip that I learned. And then a second one, I don't know. I think for me it really is like the the fact of like building the team, right? That's a really important thing. You learn a lot with building a team. But that comes down to just business in general. And with huge automation, you're going to eventually have to build a team if you want to be automated. So I think just learning to just net really networking like relationships with your team, how to build them up, how to even recruit that team and really make sure they stay with you. I think those are like the two most important things you can really like develop because those will like really catapult your business Absolutely.

Jay Feldman :

And finding a mentor no matter what type of business you're in is huge. I didn't learn that until later on in the game. It sounds like you went straight for the mentor which probably expedited your success Well,

Caleb Boxx :

technically I started way I started doing YouTube way before that though, but it was like playing around with it like like recording myself playing video games. Like it wasn't like serious, serious, but that's because I didn't know what I was doing. You know? So I did like making mistakes I just got in the game earlier. You know?

Jay Feldman :

Yeah, you got in the game early and you found a mentor early, maybe not early for you. I'm sure you were doing it before finding a mentor early a good one and learning it from somebody who's already successful, huge whether it's YouTube, whether it's you know, PPC marketing, Facebook advertising, PR, whatever you want to do, find a mentor and I have a mentorship program. Mentors collective has a program if anyone wants to join and crowdsource some insight, but super crucial for anything that you want to do and want to succeed on. With that being said, Caleb, is there any pearls of wisdom that you want to leave the audience with? And let everybody know where they can find you and connect with you?

Caleb Boxx :

Yeah, I mean, you can find me on Instagram. That's where we really connect with a lot of people because we like to direct message people and have that relationship. So you find me on Instagram at Kayla box, two axes Bo x x and with a seat most people think it's okay, but if I see,

Jay Feldman :

so, thank you. I'll link you in the show notes. Right in the descriptions everywhere. Make sure everyone connects with you puts out some good content. That's where I connected with them. And Caleb it's been a frickin Pleasure to have you on the show talking about talking about passive income YouTube automation. I've had a YouTube channel for a while. So got a lot of my questions answered to and mentors collective viewers. If you enjoyed this episode you have any questions for Caleb or questions for me about it. Go ahead. And probably the best way is either to drop a comment on YouTube, send me a DM on Instagram. And be sure to subscribe, be sure to leave us a review. And Caleb it's been a frickin blast to connect with you outside of here. And thank you so much for your insight brother. Sounds good. This is Dr. Jay Feldman. And I just wanted to take a moment to thank you so much for your support, and also ask you for a little bit more. If you can take the next 10 seconds and write us a review on iTunes, Google Play or Spotify. Just let me know your feedback. It means the world to me again. Thank you for watching. If you love this episode, please share it with your friends. Share it with your family. Until next time!